Catch water damage before it costs you

Catch water damage before it costs youSpring has arrived, bringing with it new life, fresh vegetation and buckets of rain. In between splashing in puddles and smelling the budding flowers, make sure you take the time to inspect your home in advance of increased precipitation.

Water is the number one cause of damage to homes, outnumbering fire claims. To protect your home, look out for tell-tale signs of water damage in these areas:

Roof. Check for any leaks that could be causing water to seep into the walls and foundation. If your roof has shingles, inspect it after major storms to make sure none of them have blown off. To prevent water from pooling, clean your gutters regularly to make sure nothing is restricting or diverting water flow.

Ceilings, walls and frames. Look for water stains on the ceilings and walls of every floor of your home. Check windows and doorframes for cracks, dried caulking and any signs of mould and mildew. If a room has a damp or musty odour, it’s likely that water damage is hiding somewhere.

Foundation. Most homes built after the 1950s have a foundation drain that captures water accumulated near the home’s walls through a perforated pipe. But those pipes can get clogged by sand, soil and roots and should be inspected regularly. You can help prevent clogging by planting trees at least 15 feet away from your home and keeping them pruned to slow the growth of roots. If your home’s foundation has suffered water damage, you should notify your municipality in case the damage is related to the city sewers.

Water appliances and pumps. Though they’re not affected by weather, it’s a good idea to include your toilets, washing machines and dishwashers in your regular checks. Look for broken components that could cause leaks or overflowing.

If you do discover water damage, be sure to take photos of all the damaged items in your home, even if they will need to be thrown out. This will help you with your insurance claim. Insurance providers like Belairdirect offer a variety of coverage options and can work with you to make sure you have the right coverage. Find more information online at belairdirect.com.

House hunting or selling your home? Check radon levels

House hunting or selling your home? Check radon levelsOne of the biggest mistakes both buyers and sellers make is not testing for hidden health hazards. But if you’re a buyer, you want to make sure that your new home will provide a healthy living environment for you and your family. If you’re a seller, showing that your home is free from certain dangers can help close the deal and offer potential buyers peace of mind.

One hazard that Health Canada is recommending that all homeowners test for is radon, a radioactive gas that comes from uranium in the ground and can get into a home undetected.

Since long-term exposure to radon is known to cause lung cancer, it’s a smart move to check its levels. Testing is simple — you can either purchase a do-it-yourself test kit or hire a certified radon measurement professional. The DIY kit will include instructions on how to set up the test and send it back to a lab for analysis once the testing period is over.

To get a realistic estimate of the radon exposure, all measurements should be made in the lowest lived-in level of the house where people spend more than four hours per day. Potential measurement locations include family rooms, living rooms, dens, playrooms and bedrooms. A lower level bedroom is preferred because people generally spend more time in their bedrooms than in any other room in the house. Similarly, if there will be children in the house, lowest level bedrooms or other areas such as a playroom are preferred.

Health Canada recommends a long-term test for a minimum of three months. If you’re selling, this means you should complete the test before listing your property. If you’re buying, you will need to make sure there is enough time to complete the testing or request that a clause be added to the sale agreement to allow for high radon levels to be fixed. The cost of a radon reduction system, if needed, is very small compared to the cost of the home.

A dream home doesn’t become a nightmare if it tests positive for high radon levels — techniques to lower radon levels are effective, affordable and will improve the home’s indoor air quality. A radon mitigation system can be installed in less than a day, and in most homes will reduce the radon level by more than 80 per cent for about the same cost as other common home repairs such as replacing the furnace or air conditioner.

Find more information at www.canada.ca/radon.

www.newscanada.com